THE GNOSTIC CHRIST OF BUNKER HILL      Or The Masonic Influence on the American Revolution     in Which the Mysterious Heard 'Round the World" is Revealed Chapter one of  OUR SECRET THEOCRACY    by TOM HUCKABEE                                                           [Potential Footnotes are contained in the body of this document and marked with asterisks.] This article is an attempt to marry seemingly disparate subjects and themes of interest to the author. It includes a biographical sketch of a little known but essential hero of the American Revolution, reframing the meaning of the Colonial insurrection in spiritual terms and placing it in a broader context of religious history. It will portray the development of western civilization as a fierce dialectic between literalist  (fundamentalist) and Gnostic  (Masonic) definitions of God. It will reveal the vital contribution of Freemasonry to the development of American democracy and show how a formerly secret ideology, after manifesting itself in the Constitution of the United States of America, spread like kudzu, choking the life out of monarchies throughout the world.  Finally, it will argue that our famous separation between church and state is, in fact, a veiled yet benign subterfuge. A caveat: I make no assertions of authority. I have no pertinent credentials in history or comparative religion. These are personal ruminations, revelations, if you will, crackpot speculation if you prefer. While the literal translation of Gnosis is "knowledge,” its meaning is closer to "insight" or"enlightenment.” Rather than purely an intellectual understanding, it is the complete comprehension that comes from both rational and intuited means. It accepts God but does not reject science. It embraces science but does not ignore God. Science cannot contradict God, nor vice versa. Every new revelation of science is a joyful uncovering of the nature of God. Gnostic Christians—in perpetual conflict with Roman Catholics, especially in the first five centuries AD--existed before Jesus of Nazareth.  They informed his thinking, received him as a spiritual avatar and held their own distinctive version of his story, namely The Gospel of Thomas, deemed heretical by the orthodox Catholic and Eastern Churches. Why? Gnostic teachings were ambiguous, evolving, flexible and hardly the sort of fundamentalist dogma that could be used to rally and control masses of people. Subsequently, when  Emperor Constantine in the 4thcentury sought to reconsolidate the Roman people under one religion, he looked to the Catholics over the Gnostics.  At this point, the Gnostic cults went underground, literally burying their gospels, not to be dug up until sixteen centuries later at Nag Hammadi, Egypt.
Nonetheless, Gnosticism persisted, even thrived in this underground state, alongside the dominant, mainstream church, sticking its neck out occasionally in the form of various popular “heresies,” starting with that of Pelagius (AD 345 – 420), who held that any man who applied himself could become like Jesus Christ.  According to him, Jesus was not the only son of God. “Christ” was not a man at all but a manifestation of God on earth, a holy ghost which could enter into anyone. The title Christos (Greek for anointed) was applied in the Greek Mysteries to a candidate who had passed the last degree and becomes a full initiate. It referred to God in a person. In the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible “Christos” was commonly used as a title of the Jewish Kings, those who had been anointed for reigning. St. Paul's use of the word shows that he understood its origin and mystical meaning. There were “Christs” before Jesus and more to come. Indeed, Christ is always coming, taking different forms, i.e. Osiris, Krishna, Buddha, Moses, Mohamed, Bahá'u'lláh, Abraham Lincoln, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King. Christ consciousness may manifest itself as a man, as a woman or as a myth. Jesus did not invent Christianity; he embodied it. The Knights Templar—Hollywood’s favorite warrior monks--were a Gnostic order, whether they began that way or not.  In the years leading up to their persecution, they had become defiant of the Vatican.  Some of the subsequent accusations of blasphemy and heresy—thought by later historians to be trumped up fabrications—may well have been true.  But what would have been considered anti-Christian by Catholic authorities was in actuality, simply, anti-Catholic or anti- papist. Don’t forget that Protestantism is the most successful heresy of all time, as far as the Vatican is concerned. The fact that detente evolved between these two monolithic branches of Christianity is not proof that Catholics became more tolerant of free thinkers but that the Protestants became too powerful to persecute. Let’s also not forget that the Puritans who first settled the eastern seaboard of America were fleeing religious persecution by pseudo-Catholic, Anglican, authorities. One needs to understand the origin of Freemasonry, that it began in the 1300s—not as commonly held from the stone mason guilds—but rather, as a front for the outlawed Knights Templar, who were excommunicated by the Vatican and banned by the kings of Europe. The Templars went underground, developed safe houses, secret handshakes, and rituals. Through the centuries their distrust of authoritarian rule, both religious and secular, grew. They developed a philosophy of tolerance, esotericism, and universal spirituality—“that thing on which all reasonable men can agree.”   They accepted members of all faiths and required only that initiates believe in a supreme being, perhaps a vestige of their origin as a monastic society. Spiritually, they were citizens of nowhere/everywhere, predisposed toward outcast gentlemen like themselves, beholden to no authority but God. Therefore they were “free.” They were architects of their own temples, the temples of their individual souls; hence, they were “masons”––free masons. Ideologically speaking, they were proto-Americans. * *It should be stated that I am not a Freemason, nor have I been one.  I do hold the organization in high esteem, based on my grandfather’s participation, the books I have read, and the Masons I have known.  That said, many of my assertions would baffle the average Mason and offend others. THE ORIGIN OF AMERICA: Consider that every tribe of people has an origin story.  The Ancient Romans had Romulus and Remus; Hebrews, Muslims, and Christians have Adam and Eve; The Vikings had their ice giants, Odin and a cow named Audhumbla. Scientologists have their Thetans. Do we, as Americans, have an origin story?  Of course.  It goes something like this:
   Sometime circa 1770 American colonialists, suffering under the tyrannical rule of Britain’s King George, rose up in mass, spontaneous outrage, demanding their rights as free men. When the British reacted with ruthless force, the Colonials had no recourse but violent rebellion.   You can believe that if you want, but it's hardly more factual than Norse mythology.In truth, the American Revolution was a well-planned conspiracy by a small faction of Gnostic adepts and Masonic Grand Masters to impose their spiritual and political ideology upon a continent, a gigantic safe zone for freethinkers.  At the head of the conspiracy was a man whose name is known today by less than one percent of American citizens, but in his time it was on the lips of everyone who mattered, on either side of the apocalyptic conflict.*  Had he not died prematurely in June 1775, there is little doubt he would have been the first president of the United States. *At one time in the 19th century, there were more towns and streets named after Joseph Warren than after George Washington. There were more songs written about him than about Ben Franklin and Tom Jefferson combined. He was even the lead character in a mystical rite. Indeed, for this essential player in American history, obscurity came late, and he is remembered only as the man who sent Paul Revere on his ride. BELOVED PATRIOT In 1764 Dr. Joseph Warren was twenty-three years old and the most popular physician of Boston. He had recently saved the city from a smallpox epidemic by promoting the unproven treatment of inoculation.  As a result, he won a slew of prominent clients, including John Hancock, John Adams and Samuel Adams, the principal leaders of the liberty movement of Massachusetts. The summer of 1764 found him courting a beautiful 18-year-old heiress, Elizabeth Hooton. They were married the same year and by 1770 had produced four healthy children. It was during this time that Warren got serious about politics and apprenticed himself to the notorious anti-monarchist and Puritan, Samuel Adams. Having achieved the highest Masonic degree, Dr. Warren would have been in accord with its basic tenets, such as the promotion of tolerance between people of all religious persuasions.  Not only are most religions abided by masonry, they are embraced as manifestations of fundamental metaphysical truths, regardless how differently they appear on the surface. This pan-religious spirituality might be identified by students of comparative religion as Esoteric Christianity. * *The term esoteric first appeared in English in the 1701 History of Philosophy by Thomas Stanley, in his description of the mystery school of Pythagoras. The Pythagoreans were divided into "exoteric" (under training) and"esoteric" (inner circle). "Esotericism" suggests an additional element of initiation. Such knowledge need not be kept secret, because by its very nature it is accessible only to that ­­with the proper training or aptitude. Esotericism is not a single tradition but a vast array of often unrelated figures and movements A tireless worker, Joseph Warren headed the Committees of Safety and Correspondence and was voted President of the Provisional Congress.  He tended to the wounded at the Boston Massacre and led the “Indians” at the Boston Tea Party, alongside his close friend, Paul Revere.  Not only was he in attendance at every significant revolutionary event prior to the signing of the declaration of independence,  he was for the most part in charge. Although ten years apart in age and belonging to different social classes, Paul Revere and Joseph Warren were bound by a zeal for radical politics, love of Freemasonry and the fact that in May 1773 they both lost their wives.  Elizabeth Warren died of a terrible, unnamed illness, leaving Joseph with four children after only nine years of marriage. In his grief, he penned a stirring eulogy which appeared in the Boston Gazette. In private he expressed feelings of guilt that his skills as a doctor were not great enough to save her. Earlier, Warren had sponsored Revere for Masonic membership over the objections of wellborn men like John Hancock, and throughout 1764-75 he remained the strongest link between the upper and lower echelons of rebels: the Faction and the Sons of Liberty, as they were respectively known--or more to the point: the brains and the brawn.  
There were very few Bostonians, even among the Tories, who did not recognize Dr. Warren’s integrity, charm, and brilliance.  In his practice, he treated as many royalists as patriots. It is a testament to his personal discretion that the British authorities never realized that he was, to use a modern phrase, their “worst nightmare.”  In fact, he may have been the most effective spymaster of American history. As if this was not enough activity for one man, Warren authored the Suffolk Resolves, essentially a declaration of Independence for Massachusetts, to which Thomas Jefferson referred before drafting his more celebrated document.  As the most popular speaker of the day, he was called upon each year to give the memorial address for the Boston Massacre. His speeches on these occasions were masterpieces of political propaganda, so incendiary they nearly got him assassinated by British officers. In keeping with his Masonic faith in a supreme being, he never failed to characterize human rights as God’s desire and to evoke the blessings of the Almighty upon his country. “It is our indispensable duty which we owe to God, our country, ourselves and posterity to maintain, defend and preserve those civil and religious rights which our fathers fought and died, and to hand them down entirely to future generations….  May our land be a land of liberty, the seat of virtue, the asylum of the oppressed… until the last shock of time shall bury the empires of the world in one undistinguished ruin.”  This last phrase hints at a penchant for apocalyptic thinking, another hallmark of Gnostic Christianity. By April of 1775 the once thriving port town of Boston struggled under the yoke of martial law. Most of the Faction’s leaders fled the city, reconvening in Philadelphia, where the Continental Congress was forming.   On April 18, 1775, Warren heard from one of his spies that the redcoats were preparing to march into the countryside. Their mission was twofold:  to arrest  John Hancock and Samuel Adams hiding in a tavern at Lexington and then to continue down the road to Concord to destroy a cache of American guns and powder.  Contrary to a specific agreement arrived at by the Committee of Safety, Warren consulted no one other than himself before sending Paul Revere to alert the Minutemen and assist Hancock and Adams in their escape. * * A rare instance of Warren acting unilaterally, and it has been said that by this action, he essentially declared war on the British on behalf of the American Colonies. When the British arrived in Lexington they were surprised to meet a company of Americans assembled on the green, intending to interfere with their mission. Then, as every schoolboy in 20thcentury America could have told you, someone fired “a shot heard ‘round the world.” Years later during an official inquiry, Paul Revere testified that he was present for the exchange, having been sent back to Lexington by Sam Adams to retrieve a trunk of papers. He said he observed a shot emitting from an upper floor window of a tavern, inferring that the Americans had fired first. No one apparently thought to ask Mr. Revere if he had fired the shot himself. Certainly, it would not have been beyond Samuel Adams, a firm believer in the ends justifying the means, to have instructed Revere to make sure the reluctant troops on both sides came to blows. Meanwhile, Joseph Warren laid aside his stethoscope and picked up a musket, helping command the militia as they chased and punished the British from Concord bridge back to Boston. He boasted afterward of losing a lock of his hair to an enemy bullet. Although he was appointed Surgeon General of the Continental Army, Warren rejected the job, preferring more hazardous duty, and received the rank of major general. He was nominated for Commander of the armies, but voted for George Washington over himself, as he had no military experience.    
During the early days of June 1775, he argued against the fortification of Bunker Hill, maintaining that it was an untenable position without a route for escape and that the Americans weren't ready to meet the British in conventional warfare.  Once outvoted, however, he joined the fight as a volunteer, refusing to assume command when it was offered to him by the legendary Indian fighter Gen. Israel Putnam, arguing that he had not yet received his commission. He was sent to the front lines at Breed’s Hill, where he once again refused to pull rank on Colonel William Prescott, requesting that he be placed where he would be most useful. The appearance of such a popular figure as Warren boosted the spirits of the amateur militia, mostly farmers, daunted by the prospect of clashing with the most renowned war machine on earth. After a massive cannonade failed to dislodge the rebels, the British troops marched up the hill with fixed bayonets in a great orderly mass, attended by drums, pipes, and flags, fully expecting the American morale to dissolve and the rebels to disperse like rats. Colonel Prescott, concerned that his exhausted and nervous troops might waste their very limited ammunition, gave the order: "Don't fire till you see the whites of their eyes!" When the British were within a few yards from the American fortification, a massive sheet of flame shot out, mowing down the front ranks of redcoats.  The survivors retreated, regrouped and climbed back up the hill, meeting the same awesome wall of fire. All but one British officer was killed. When the redcoats managed to organize one final, desperate assault, climbing over slaughtered and wounded comrades, the Americans ran out of bullets and had no choice but to abandon fort. Throughout the day, Joseph Warren had been in the thickest part of the fight.  At its climax, he was one of thirty volunteers who stayed behind to cover the retreat of the others.  Surrounded and armed only with a rifle butt, Warren refused to surrender and was shot between the eyes, dying, as he had once predicted he would, up to his “knees in British blood." Summarily disposed of in a mass grave, his body was exhumed nine months later, after the Americans retook Boston.  He was identified by Paul Revere, who recognized the false teeth that he had crafted for his friend.  Warren’s body was transported in a grand Masonic procession and reburied at King's Chapel, the only church still standing after the devastation of the American siege. Some 1,100 British soldiers were killed or wounded at Bunker Hill, compared to 400 Americans.  General Putnam said he would like to sell another hill at the same price, while British General Howe said that Warren's death was worth 500 men.*  * The gallant General Howe, who had argued openly against war with the Colonies, was recalled to England and court-martialed for his immense tactical blunder at Bunker Hil l.He was even accused of collaborating with the enemy, his Masonic membership cited as circumstantial evidence. Although acquitted of the charge, he was reassigned to the European front. Abigail Adams wrote to her husband John, who was in Philadelphia at the time with the Continental Congress trying to decide whether to declare independence from Britain: "Not all the havoc and devastation they (the British) have made has wounded me like the death of Warren. We want him in the Senate; we want him in his profession; we want him in the field.  We mourn for the citizen, the senator, the physician, and the warrior." In a letter to Warren's brother James, John Adams wrote that he regretted that Joseph had taken on so much responsibility:
"...President of Congress, Chairman of the Committee of Safety, Major General and Chief Surgeon of the Army was too much for one mortal, and this has deprived us forever of one of our best and ablest men.” Further comments by Adams insinuated that Warren was perhaps too reckless for his own good, that political leaders should be more disciplined and not give way to their passions. The death of the colonies'  “most beloved patriot” combined with the valiant show by untried American troops at Bunker Hill were two important factors that pushed our reluctant founding fathers—all prominent citizens with much to lose--into taking the last drastic steps toward independence.  Indeed, one might say that they were shamed into signing by Warren’s total sacrifice, which leads us to a great mystery regarding the charismatic Dr. Warren.  Why did such an important political and spiritual leader have chosen to fight like a common soldier? Sam Adams, John Adams, Ben Franklin, Tom Jefferson, etc. never took up arms. They fled to safety under cover of darkness whenever the British got close. Why did Warren refuse command at Bunker Hill?  Why did he serve on the front lines and then stay behind to cover the retreat? Finally, why did he not surrender when the battle was lost, and he was given the opportunity to do so? In fact, every action taken by Joseph Warren on June 17, 1775, indicates that he did not intend to live through the day.  One report from an eyewitness states that he remarked to a young woman on the night before the battle: “Come have a drink with me, for I shall go to the hill tomorrow and not return.” No one knows for sure, he left no suicide note; but imagine for a moment a man wracked with grief over the loss of his wife and haunted by the thought that he had failed to save her, a man whose one remaining passion, nay obsession,  was the liberation of his country from tyranny.  Why not light the fuse of revolution by martyring himself, disguise his own suicide, and reunite with his beloved in the afterlife? * *In light of the almost daily suicide bombings in the Middle East today, such a mindset is not difficult to believe. But there is an additional, even deeper riddle: What made Joseph Warren so determined to help establish a democratic republic in the New World?  To answer this, let’s skip ahead a few years, past the American triumph at Yorktown to George Washington’s surprising refusal to proclaim himself king. His best officers desired it, for they worshipped him and feared chaos if power was not consolidated. The populace would have supported it, for they had known no other form of government. The members of Congress, dispersed, exhausted and impoverished by the war, may have acquiesced to it.  Had there ever been a rebel commander in history who did not reap the spoils of success by donning royal vestments? Julius Caesar was a fervent republican, but it didn’t stop him from becoming emperor of Rome. Likewise, Napoleon Bonaparte, a republican artillery officer during the French revolution, later crowned himself emperor of the world. These are but two of the most famous examples. The explanation is that there had never been a successful popular revolt formed around the principals of Freemasonry, an esoteric society dedicated to the proposition that all men were equal in God’s eyes.*  Equality precluded aristocracy.  *The 14thcentury Peasant Revolt in Britain, led by former members of the KnightsTemplar, could be seen as a precedent to the American Revolution, but even they had no intention to overthrow the king, only to root out corruption in his court. It took another 400  years of monarchist tyranny for the descendants of the underground Templars to emerge as Freemasons and for its most radical members to set their sights on democracy. The American Revolution was only the first of an avalanche of democratic revolutions fomented by Freemasons, i.e. Danton in France, Simon Bolivar in South America, Juarez in Mexico, Sam Houston in Texas. Even the Bolsheviks had a Masonic origin.  All of Western civilization eventually gave way to democratic (read Masonic) forms of government.
The American Revolution may not have been “a Freemason conspiracy.” After all Masonic doctrine bans political discussion within the lodge.  But it was certainly a conspiracy of Freemasons (with a few exceptions like John Adams and Thomas Jefferson). Joseph Warren was at least one of the first (perhaps the only) man to hold the title of Grandmaster of the continent of America. At a surprisingly young age, he had so impressed the grandmasters of Scotland that they took him into their innermost circle. He would have been privy to their most esoteric secrets and indoctrinated into their special view of history, tracing themselves back to the Egyptian Mysteries of Osiris. He would have heard the suggestion that Moses, Jesus, Mohammed were all members of this secret, underground, Gnostic brotherhood.  In the story of Jesus Christ, he would have recognized the power of martyrdom to transform civilization. Joseph Warren shared attributes with Jesus: vitality, charm, kindness, fearlessness, the power to heal, the gift of oratory, devoted disciples, hope for a better future, advocacy for the poor, a desire to lead his people to break free of a ruthless, foreign dictator. Perhaps the most significant difference between them was their attitudes on the tactic of physical force to achieve their aims. Mentored by the street-fighting Sam Adams, Warren was no pacifist. On the contrary, belying his Hippocratic oath, he relished a good fight. So, if Warren identified strongly with Jesus, it was in the whole mythological being of Jesus Christ, the fearsome, resurrected healer-turned-warrior, smiting evil doers with a mighty sword, a la the Book of Revelation. Warren would have also known the story of Jaques DeMolay, the last grandmaster of the Knights Templar, who was tortured and executed for refusing to renounce his brethren and ideals.  He may have seen himself, like DeMolay, as a warrior priest. Furthermore, he likely believed, as many Gnostics, Freemasons, and adherents of other esoteric traditions, that the height of spirituality, embodied in the depiction of Jesus Christ in the New Testament, was available to any man who applied himself.  To Warren, Jesus was not God, but a man who had attained the highest level of humanity, someone devoted to others endowed with Christ consciousness: a savior.  He gave his life so that the United States of America could be born. In closing, I’d like you to consider the radical notion that the American Constitution is a kind holy writ—an eighteenth-century covenant between God and Man, no less indispensable than the Torah, the New Testament or the Koran to the people who swear allegiance to it. The United States, envisioned by our founding fathers, was a manifestation of  God, the Great Architect's, desire, or as the Gnostic reformist Abraham Lincoln put it: “the last best chance of Man on earth.” I submit, therefore, that there is no true separation of religion and state in America. The state is a benign theocracy created by freethinkers, a religion whose dogma demands tolerance of all religions, protects all races, creeds and opinions, elects its own leaders by popular vote, and views all people as equal in the eyes of God, the fact that we, the body politic, follow the rules intermittently, begrudgingly and half-heartedly, not withstanding. END OF CHAPTER ONE © copyright Tom Huckabee . 2017
   THE GNOSTIC CHRIST OF BUNKER HILL      Or The Masonic Influence on the American Revolution     in Which the Mysterious Heard 'Round the World" is Revealed Chapter one of  OUR SECRET THEOCRACY    by TOM HUCKABEE                                                           [Potential Footnotes are contained in the body of this document and marked with asterisks.] This article is an attempt to marry seemingly disparate subjects and themes of interest to the author. It includes a biographical sketch of a little known but essential hero of the American Revolution, reframing the meaning of the Colonial insurrection in spiritual terms and placing it in a broader context of religious history. It will portray the development of western civilization as a fierce dialectic between literalist  (fundamentalist) and Gnostic  (Masonic) definitions of God. It will reveal the vital contribution of Freemasonry to the development of American democracy and show how a formerly secret ideology, after manifesting itself in the Constitution of the United States of America, spread like kudzu, choking the life out of monarchies throughout the world.  Finally, it will argue that our famous separation between church and state is, in fact, a veiled yet benign subterfuge. A caveat: I make no assertions of authority. I have no pertinent credentials in history or comparative religion. These are personal ruminations, revelations, if you will, crackpot speculation if you prefer. While the literal translation of Gnosis is "knowledge,” its meaning is closer to "insight" or"enlightenment.” Rather than purely an intellectual understanding, it is the complete comprehension that comes from both rational and intuited means. It accepts God but does not reject science. It embraces science but does not ignore God. Science cannot contradict God, nor vice versa. Every new revelation of science is a joyful uncovering of the nature of God. Gnostic Christians—in perpetual conflict with Roman Catholics, especially in the first five centuries AD--existed before Jesus of Nazareth.  They informed his thinking, received him as a spiritual avatar and held their own distinctive version of his story, namely The Gospel of Thomas, deemed heretical by the orthodox Catholic and Eastern Churches. Why? Gnostic teachings were ambiguous, evolving, flexible and hardly the sort of fundamentalist dogma that could be used to rally and control masses of people. Subsequently, when  Emperor Constantine in the 4thcentury sought to reconsolidate the Roman people under one religion, he looked to the Catholics over the Gnostics.  At this point, the Gnostic cults went underground, literally burying their gospels, not to be dug up until sixteen centuries later at Nag Hammadi, Egypt.
Nonetheless, Gnosticism persisted, even thrived in this underground state, alongside the dominant, mainstream church, sticking its neck out occasionally in the form of various popular “heresies,” starting with that of Pelagius (AD 345 – 420), who held that any man who applied himself could become like Jesus Christ.  According to him, Jesus was not the only son of God. “Christ” was not a man at all but a manifestation of God on earth, a holy ghost which could enter into anyone. The title Christos (Greek for anointed) was applied in the Greek Mysteries to a candidate who had passed the last degree and becomes a full initiate. It referred to God in a person. In the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible “Christos” was commonly used as a title of the Jewish Kings, those who had been anointed for reigning. St. Paul's use of the word shows that he understood its origin and mystical meaning. There were “Christs” before Jesus and more to come. Indeed, Christ is always coming, taking different forms, i.e. Osiris, Krishna, Buddha, Moses, Mohamed, Bahá'u'lláh, Abraham Lincoln, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King. Christ consciousness may manifest itself as a man, as a woman or as a myth. Jesus did not invent Christianity; he embodied it. The Knights Templar—Hollywood’s favorite warrior monks-- were a Gnostic order, whether they began that way or not.  In the years leading up to their persecution, they had become defiant of the Vatican.  Some of the subsequent accusations of blasphemy and heresy—thought by later historians to be trumped up fabrications—may well have been true.  But what would have been considered anti-Christian by Catholic authorities was in actuality, simply, anti-Catholic or anti-papist. Don’t forget that Protestantism is the most successful heresy of all time, as far as the Vatican is concerned. The fact that detente evolved between these two monolithic branches of Christianity is not proof that Catholics became more tolerant of free thinkers but that the Protestants became too powerful to persecute. Let’s also not forget that the Puritans who first settled the eastern seaboard of America were fleeing religious persecution by pseudo-Catholic, Anglican, authorities. One needs to understand the origin of Freemasonry, that it began in the 1300s—not as commonly held from the stone mason guilds—but rather, as a front for the outlawed Knights Templar, who were excommunicated by the Vatican and banned by the kings of Europe. The Templars went underground, developed safe houses, secret handshakes, and rituals. Through the centuries their distrust of authoritarian rule, both religious and secular, grew. They developed a philosophy of tolerance, esotericism, and universal spirituality—“that thing on which all reasonable men can agree.”   They accepted members of all faiths and required only that initiates believe in a supreme being, perhaps a vestige of their origin as a monastic society. Spiritually, they were citizens of nowhere/everywhere, predisposed toward outcast gentlemen like themselves, beholden to no authority but God. Therefore they were “free.” They were architects of their own temples, the temples of their individual souls; hence, they were “masons”––free masons. Ideologically speaking, they were proto- Americans. * *It should be stated that I am not a Freemason, nor have I been one.  I do hold the organization in high esteem, based on my grandfather’s participation, the books I have read, and the Masons I have known.  That said, many of my assertions would baffle the average Mason and offend others. THE ORIGIN OF AMERICA: Consider that every tribe of people has an origin story.  The Ancient Romans had Romulus and Remus; Hebrews, Muslims, and Christians have Adam and Eve; The Vikings had their ice giants, Odin and a cow named Audhumbla. Scientologists have their Thetans. Do we, as Americans, have an origin story?  Of course.  It goes something like this:
   Sometime circa 1770 American colonialists, suffering under the tyrannical rule of Britain’s King George, rose up in mass, spontaneous outrage, demanding their rights as free men. When the British reacted with ruthless force, the Colonials had no recourse but violent rebellion.   You can believe that if you want, but it's hardly more factual than Norse mythology.In truth, the American Revolution was a well-planned conspiracy by a small faction of Gnostic adepts and Masonic Grand Masters to impose their spiritual and political ideology upon a continent, a gigantic safe zone for freethinkers.  At the head of the conspiracy was a man whose name is known today by less than one percent of American citizens, but in his time it was on the lips of everyone who mattered, on either side of the apocalyptic conflict.*  Had he not died prematurely in June 1775, there is little doubt he would have been the first president of the United States. *At one time in the 19th century, there were more towns and streets named after Joseph Warren than after George Washington. There were more songs written about him than about Ben Franklin and Tom Jefferson combined. He was even the lead character in a mystical rite. Indeed, for this essential player in American history, obscurity came late, and he is remembered only as the man who sent Paul Revere on his ride. BELOVED PATRIOT In 1764 Dr. Joseph Warren was twenty-three years old and the most popular physician of Boston. He had recently saved the city from a smallpox epidemic by promoting the unproven treatment of inoculation.  As a result, he won a slew of prominent clients, including John Hancock, John Adams and Samuel Adams, the principal leaders of the liberty movement of Massachusetts. The summer of 1764 found him courting a beautiful 18-year-old heiress, Elizabeth Hooton. They were married the same year and by 1770 had produced four healthy children. It was during this time that Warren got serious about politics and apprenticed himself to the notorious anti-monarchist and Puritan, Samuel Adams. Having achieved the highest Masonic degree, Dr. Warren would have been in accord with its basic tenets, such as the promotion of tolerance between people of all religious persuasions.  Not only are most religions abided by masonry, they are embraced as manifestations of fundamental metaphysical truths, regardless how differently they appear on the surface. This pan-religious spirituality might be identified by students of comparative religion as Esoteric Christianity. * *The term esoteric first appeared in English in the 1701 History of Philosophy by Thomas Stanley, in his description of the mystery school of Pythagoras. The Pythagoreans were divided into "exoteric" (under training) and"esoteric" (inner circle). "Esotericism" suggests an additional element of initiation. Such knowledge need not be kept secret, because by its very nature it is accessible only to that ­­with the proper training or aptitude. Esotericism is not a single tradition but a vast array of often unrelated figures and movements A tireless worker, Joseph Warren headed the Committees of Safety and Correspondence and was voted President of the Provisional Congress.  He tended to the wounded at the Boston Massacre and led the “Indians” at the Boston Tea Party, alongside his close friend, Paul Revere.  Not only was he in attendance at every significant revolutionary event prior to the signing of the declaration of independence,  he was for the most part in charge. Although ten years apart in age and belonging to different social classes, Paul Revere and Joseph Warren were bound by a zeal for radical politics, love of Freemasonry and the fact that in May 1773 they both lost their wives.  Elizabeth Warren died of a terrible, unnamed illness, leaving Joseph with four children after only nine years of marriage. In his grief, he penned a stirring eulogy which appeared in the Boston Gazette. In private he expressed feelings of guilt that his skills as a doctor were not great enough to save her. Earlier, Warren had sponsored Revere for Masonic membership over the objections of wellborn men like John Hancock, and throughout 1764-75 he remained the strongest link between the upper and lower echelons of rebels: the Faction and the Sons of Liberty, as they were respectively known--or more to the point: the brains and the brawn.  
There were very few Bostonians, even among the Tories, who did not recognize Dr. Warren’s integrity, charm, and brilliance.  In his practice, he treated as many royalists as patriots. It is a testament to his personal discretion that the British authorities never realized that he was, to use a modern phrase, their “worst nightmare.”  In fact, he may have been the most effective spymaster of American history. As if this was not enough activity for one man, Warren authored the Suffolk Resolves, essentially a declaration of Independence for Massachusetts, to which Thomas Jefferson referred before drafting his more celebrated document.  As the most popular speaker of the day, he was called upon each year to give the memorial address for the Boston Massacre. His speeches on these occasions were masterpieces of political propaganda, so incendiary they nearly got him assassinated by British officers. In keeping with his Masonic faith in a supreme being, he never failed to characterize human rights as God’s desire and to evoke the blessings of the Almighty upon his country. “It is our indispensable duty which we owe to God, our country, ourselves and posterity to maintain, defend and preserve those civil and religious rights which our fathers fought and died, and to hand them down entirely to future generations….  May our land be a land of liberty, the seat of virtue, the asylum of the oppressed… until the last shock of time shall bury the empires of the world in one undistinguished ruin.”  This last phrase hints at a penchant for apocalyptic thinking, another hallmark of Gnostic Christianity. By April of 1775 the once thriving port town of Boston struggled under the yoke of martial law. Most of the Faction’s leaders fled the city, reconvening in Philadelphia, where the Continental Congress was forming.   On April 18, 1775, Warren heard from one of his spies that the redcoats were preparing to march into the countryside. Their mission was twofold:  to arrest  John Hancock and Samuel Adams hiding in a tavern at Lexington and then to continue down the road to Concord to destroy a cache of American guns and powder.  Contrary to a specific agreement arrived at by the Committee of Safety, Warren consulted no one other than himself before sending Paul Revere to alert the Minutemen and assist Hancock and Adams in their escape. * * A rare instance of Warren acting unilaterally, and it has been said that by this action, he essentially declared war on the British on behalf of the American Colonies. When the British arrived in Lexington they were surprised to meet a company of Americans assembled on the green, intending to interfere with their mission. Then, as every schoolboy in 20thcentury America could have told you, someone fired “a shot heard ‘round the world.” Years later during an official inquiry, Paul Revere testified that he was present for the exchange, having been sent back to Lexington by Sam Adams to retrieve a trunk of papers. He said he observed a shot emitting from an upper floor window of a tavern, inferring that the Americans had fired first. No one apparently thought to ask Mr. Revere if he had fired the shot himself. Certainly, it would not have been beyond Samuel Adams, a firm believer in the ends justifying the means, to have instructed Revere to make sure the reluctant troops on both sides came to blows. Meanwhile, Joseph Warren laid aside his stethoscope and picked up a musket, helping command the militia as they chased and punished the British from Concord bridge back to Boston. He boasted afterward of losing a lock of his hair to an enemy bullet. Although he was appointed Surgeon General of the Continental Army, Warren rejected the job, preferring more hazardous duty, and received the rank of major general. He was nominated for Commander of the armies, but voted for George Washington over himself, as he had no military experience.    
During the early days of June 1775, he argued against the fortification of Bunker Hill, maintaining that it was an untenable position without a route for escape and that the Americans weren't ready to meet the British in conventional warfare.  Once outvoted, however, he joined the fight as a volunteer, refusing to assume command when it was offered to him by the legendary Indian fighter Gen. Israel Putnam, arguing that he had not yet received his commission. He was sent to the front lines at Breed’s Hill, where he once again refused to pull rank on Colonel William Prescott, requesting that he be placed where he would be most useful. The appearance of such a popular figure as Warren boosted the spirits of the amateur militia, mostly farmers, daunted by the prospect of clashing with the most renowned war machine on earth. After a massive cannonade failed to dislodge the rebels, the British troops marched up the hill with fixed bayonets in a great orderly mass, attended by drums, pipes, and flags, fully expecting the American morale to dissolve and the rebels to disperse like rats. Colonel Prescott, concerned that his exhausted and nervous troops might waste their very limited ammunition, gave the order: "Don't fire till you see the whites of their eyes!" When the British were within a few yards from the American fortification, a massive sheet of flame shot out, mowing down the front ranks of redcoats.  The survivors retreated, regrouped and climbed back up the hill, meeting the same awesome wall of fire. All but one British officer was killed. When the redcoats managed to organize one final, desperate assault, climbing over slaughtered and wounded comrades, the Americans ran out of bullets and had no choice but to abandon fort. Throughout the day, Joseph Warren had been in the thickest part of the fight.  At its climax, he was one of thirty volunteers who stayed behind to cover the retreat of the others.  Surrounded and armed only with a rifle butt, Warren refused to surrender and was shot between the eyes, dying, as he had once predicted he would, up to his “knees in British blood." Summarily disposed of in a mass grave, his body was exhumed nine months later, after the Americans retook Boston.  He was identified by Paul Revere, who recognized the false teeth that he had crafted for his friend.  Warren’s body was transported in a grand Masonic procession and reburied at King's Chapel, the only church still standing after the devastation of the American siege. Some 1,100 British soldiers were killed or wounded at Bunker Hill, compared to 400 Americans.  General Putnam said he would like to sell another hill at the same price, while British General Howe said that Warren's death was worth 500 men.*  * The gallant General Howe, who had argued openly against war with the Colonies, was recalled to England and court-martialed for his immense tactical blunder at Bunker Hil l.He was even accused of collaborating with the enemy, his Masonic membership cited as circumstantial evidence. Although acquitted of the charge, he was reassigned to the European front. Abigail Adams wrote to her husband John, who was in Philadelphia at the time with the Continental Congress trying to decide whether to declare independence from Britain: "Not all the havoc and devastation they (the British) have made has wounded me like the death of Warren. We want him in the Senate; we want him in his profession; we want him in the field.  We mourn for the citizen, the senator, the physician, and the warrior." In a letter to Warren's brother James, John Adams wrote that he regretted that Joseph had taken on so much responsibility:
"...President of Congress, Chairman of the Committee of Safety, Major General and Chief Surgeon of the Army was too much for one mortal, and this has deprived us forever of one of our best and ablest men.” Further comments by Adams insinuated that Warren was perhaps too reckless for his own good, that political leaders should be more disciplined and not give way to their passions. The death of the colonies'  “most beloved patriot” combined with the valiant show by untried American troops at Bunker Hill were two important factors that pushed our reluctant founding fathers—all prominent citizens with much to lose--into taking the last drastic steps toward independence.  Indeed, one might say that they were shamed into signing by Warren’s total sacrifice, which leads us to a great mystery regarding the charismatic Dr. Warren.  Why did such an important political and spiritual leader have chosen to fight like a common soldier? Sam Adams, John Adams, Ben Franklin, Tom Jefferson, etc. never took up arms. They fled to safety under cover of darkness whenever the British got close. Why did Warren refuse command at Bunker Hill?  Why did he serve on the front lines and then stay behind to cover the retreat? Finally, why did he not surrender when the battle was lost, and he was given the opportunity to do so? In fact, every action taken by Joseph Warren on June 17, 1775, indicates that he did not intend to live through the day.  One report from an eyewitness states that he remarked to a young woman on the night before the battle: “Come have a drink with me, for I shall go to the hill tomorrow and not return.” No one knows for sure, he left no suicide note; but imagine for a moment a man wracked with grief over the loss of his wife and haunted by the thought that he had failed to save her, a man whose one remaining passion, nay obsession,  was the liberation of his country from tyranny.  Why not light the fuse of revolution by martyring himself, disguise his own suicide, and reunite with his beloved in the afterlife? * *In light of the almost daily suicide bombings in the Middle East today, such a mindset is not difficult to believe. But there is an additional, even deeper riddle: What made Joseph Warren so determined to help establish a democratic republic in the New World?  To answer this, let’s skip ahead a few years, past the American triumph at Yorktown to George Washington’s surprising refusal to proclaim himself king. His best officers desired it, for they worshipped him and feared chaos if power was not consolidated. The populace would have supported it, for they had known no other form of government. The members of Congress, dispersed, exhausted and impoverished by the war, may have acquiesced to it.  Had there ever been a rebel commander in history who did not reap the spoils of success by donning royal vestments? Julius Caesar was a fervent republican, but it didn’t stop him from becoming emperor of Rome. Likewise, Napoleon Bonaparte, a republican artillery officer during the French revolution, later crowned himself emperor of the world. These are but two of the most famous examples. The explanation is that there had never been a successful popular revolt formed around the principals of Freemasonry, an esoteric society dedicated to the proposition that all men were equal in God’s eyes.*  Equality precluded aristocracy.  *The 14thcentury Peasant Revolt in Britain, led by former members of the KnightsTemplar, could be seen as a precedent to the American Revolution, but even they had no intention to overthrow the king, only to root out corruption in his court. It took another 400  years of monarchist tyranny for the descendants of the underground Templars to emerge as Freemasons and for its most radical members to set their sights on democracy. The American Revolution was only the first of an avalanche of democratic revolutions fomented by Freemasons, i.e. Danton in France, Simon Bolivar in South America, Juarez in Mexico, Sam Houston in Texas. Even the Bolsheviks had a Masonic origin.  All of Western civilization eventually gave way to democratic (read Masonic) forms of government.
The American Revolution may not have been “a Freemason conspiracy.” After all Masonic doctrine bans political discussion within the lodge.  But it was certainly a conspiracy of Freemasons (with a few exceptions like John Adams and Thomas Jefferson). Joseph Warren was at least one of the first (perhaps the only) man to hold the title of Grandmaster of the continent of America. At a surprisingly young age, he had so impressed the grandmasters of Scotland that they took him into their innermost circle. He would have been privy to their most esoteric secrets and indoctrinated into their special view of history, tracing themselves back to the Egyptian Mysteries of Osiris. He would have heard the suggestion that Moses, Jesus, Mohammed were all members of this secret, underground, Gnostic brotherhood.  In the story of Jesus Christ, he would have recognized the power of martyrdom to transform civilization. Joseph Warren shared attributes with Jesus: vitality, charm, kindness, fearlessness, the power to heal, the gift of oratory, devoted disciples, hope for a better future, advocacy for the poor, a desire to lead his people to break free of a ruthless, foreign dictator. Perhaps the most significant difference between them was their attitudes on the tactic of physical force to achieve their aims. Mentored by the street-fighting Sam Adams, Warren was no pacifist. On the contrary, belying his Hippocratic oath, he relished a good fight. So, if Warren identified strongly with Jesus, it was in the whole mythological being of Jesus Christ, the fearsome, resurrected healer-turned-warrior, smiting evil doers with a mighty sword, a la the Book of Revelation. Warren would have also known the story of Jaques DeMolay, the last grandmaster of the Knights Templar, who was tortured and executed for refusing to renounce his brethren and ideals.  He may have seen himself, like DeMolay, as a warrior priest. Furthermore, he likely believed, as many Gnostics, Freemasons, and adherents of other esoteric traditions, that the height of spirituality, embodied in the depiction of Jesus Christ in the New Testament, was available to any man who applied himself.  To Warren, Jesus was not God, but a man who had attained the highest level of humanity, someone devoted to others endowed with Christ consciousness: a savior.  He gave his life so that the United States of America could be born. In closing, I’d like you to consider the radical notion that the American Constitution is a kind holy writ—an eighteenth-century covenant between God and Man, no less indispensable than the Torah, the New Testament or the Koran to the people who swear allegiance to it. The United States, envisioned by our founding fathers, was a manifestation of  God, the Great Architect's, desire, or as the Gnostic reformist Abraham Lincoln put it: “the last best chance of Man on earth.” I submit, therefore, that there is no true separation of religion and state in America. The state is a benign theocracy created by freethinkers, a religion whose dogma demands tolerance of all religions, protects all races, creeds and opinions, elects its own leaders by popular vote, and views all people as equal in the eyes of God, the fact that we, the body politic, follow the rules intermittently, begrudgingly and half- heartedly, not withstanding. END OF CHAPTER ONE © copyright Tom Huckabee . 2017